February 16, 2018 - DNR fisheries seeks comments on Sand, Tamarack lake management plans

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Duluth area fisheries is seeking comments through Friday, March 16 on updated lake management plans for Sand and Tamarack lakes in Carlton County.

“Management plans describe the past, present and desired future conditions of the waters,” said Deserae Hendrickson, Duluth area fisheries manager. “The plans identify specific management activities planned for that lake or stream in the next five to 20 years and are a good opportunity for the public to share their observations about the fishery.”

Every year DNR fisheries staff prepares or revises individual lake and stream management plans for several waters in each management area. Sand and Tamarack lakes are being reviewed with the following actions proposed:

Sand Lake (Carlton County) – updated plan adding re-introductory stocking following winterkill events.

Tamarack Lake (Carlton County) – evaluation of fingerling stocking program and change in sampling frequency.

Interested parties can review current plans for lakes in the area as well as recent fish population assessment information at the DNR’s Duluth area fisheries office, 5351 N. Shore Drive in Duluth. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. People may call 218-302-3267 or email Pam Hetland at pam.hetland@state.mn.us to request a copy of a plan or submit comments on a plan.

Public comments on management of these Duluth area lakes will be taken through Friday, March 16.  Suggestions for management of any of the other lakes and streams in the Duluth area are welcome at any time and will be considered when those plans are due for review.



February 16, 2018 - DNR seeks comments on Grand Rapids area lake and stream management plans

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Grand Rapids area fisheries is seeking comments through Friday, March 16 on management plans for a number of area lakes.

Management plans describe the past, present, and desired future conditions of the waters. The plans identify specific management activities planned for that lake or stream in the next five to 20 years, and are a good opportunity for the public to share their observations about the fishery.

Every year DNR fisheries staff prepares or revises individual lake management plans for several waters in each management area. In the Grand Rapids area, plans for the following lakes and streams are being reviewed:

  • Batson – general fish management.
  • Black Island – general fish management.
  • Bluewater – general fish management, lake trout stocking review.
  • Carey – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Caribou – general fish management, lake trout stocking review.
  • Clear (Spring Lake) – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Cut Foot Sioux – general fish management.
  • Dead Horse – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Deer (Deer River) – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Gunn – general fish management.
  • Harrigan Creek – general fish management.
  • LaRue Mine Pit- general fish management, rainbow trout stocking review.
  • Little Bass (Cohasset) – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Little Cut Foot – general fish management.
  • Little Winnibigoshish – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Long – general fish management.
  • Loon (Cohasset) – general fish management.
  • McAlpine Creek – general fish management.
  • Mirror – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Orange – general fish management, muskellunge targeted survey.
  • Ruby – walleye stocking review.
  • Sand (Max) – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Shallow Pond – general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • Sissebakwet- general fish management, walleye stocking review.
  • South Sugar – general fish management.
  • Trout (Deer River) – general fish management, lake trout stocking review.

Current plans for lakes and streams in the area, as well as recent fish population assessment information are available for review at the DNR’s Grand Rapids area fisheries office, at 1201 East Hwy 2, Grand Rapids, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. For more information, call or email David Weitzel at 218-328-8835 or david.weitzel@state.mn.us.

Public comments on management of these waters will be taken through Friday, March 16.  Comments and suggestions for management of any other streams and lakes in the Grand Rapids area are welcomed at any time and will be considered when those plans are due for review.



February 15, 2018 - A simple choice at tax time can warm spirit and help wildlife

Need something to lift the spirits in the midst of this winter’s recurring cold and snow? Looking for a way to make a big difference with a small investment? 

Filing state income taxes might not be the first thing that comes to mind as an antidote for the winter blahs, unless one realizes that it offers the chance to help more than 800 species of nongame wildlife, some of them threatened or endangered. Line 21 of the Minnesota income tax form – marked by a loon — provides individuals with an opportunity to invest in the future of nongame wildlife.

When taxpayers designate an amount they would like to donate to the Nongame Wildlife Program, their tax-deductible donations are matched one-to-one by state conservation license plate funds. The Nongame Wildlife Program receives no money from the state’s general fund for its efforts to support a wide range of animals that aren’t hunted — from eagles and loons to turtles and butterflies. It receives no funding from hunting and fishing license fees, lottery proceeds or sales taxes. It relies almost entirely on voluntary donations to support its work.

That work includes research to understand how creatures fit within functioning ecosystems, managing habitat, and assisting with recovery efforts for rare species. Over the program’s 41-year history, it has played an important role in the recovery of bald eagles, trumpeter swans, eastern bluebirds, peregrine falcons, and many more species. It also provides nature education, including such highly popular features as the DNR EagleCam now in its sixth year of streaming live video from a Twin Cities bald eagle nest.

“The Nongame Wildlife checkoff is a great way to warm one’s spirit on a cold, winter day by helping fund something we all care about,” said DNR Nongame Wildlife Program supervisor Carrol Henderson. “We all want a future where our kids and grandkids will still be able to chase butterflies, listen to frogs and loons on summer nights, watch falcons and eagles — in person or on a webcam. That’s what the Nongame Wildlife Program is all about.”

For more information on the DNR Nongame Wildlife Program, its success stories and ways to volunteer and donate, visit the nongame wildlife page.



February 15, 2018 - Spring light goose harvest begins Feb. 15

Enormous flocks of snow geese fill the skies each spring in the central United States, including in far western Minnesota, as they migrate toward the Arctic. 

The flocks weren’t always so large. More intensive agriculture in decades past gave the birds easier access to food, and eventually an overpopulation of the geese caused considerable damage to fragile ecosystems in Arctic coastal areas and around Hudson Bay.

Hunters have an opportunity to help reduce the population of light geese through a federally authorized spring conservation harvest. This year, light geese can be taken Thursday, Feb. 15, through Monday, April 30. Light geese are snow geese, blue-phased snow geese and the smaller Ross’s goose.

“Minnesota participates in the action, but in our region the majority of the light geese take happens west of the state,” said Steve Cordts, waterfowl specialist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “The harvest in Minnesota has varied from a few hundred to several thousand.”

The conservation action is authorized by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which allows harvest of specific bird species during times when other waterfowl seasons are closed. Minnesota has participated in this spring conservation harvest each year since 2000.

To participate, a spring light goose permit is required and may be obtained wherever Minnesota hunting licenses are sold, via telephone at 888-665-4236 or online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense. There is a $2.50 application fee to cover the cost of issuing the permit. No other license, stamp or permit is required.

A summary of regulations is available at mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl/lightgoose, from license vendors, DNR wildlife offices or by calling the DNR Information Center at 888-646-6367 or 651-296-6157.



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DNR News FEB 16th

DNR fisheries seeks comments on Sand, Tamarack lake management plans

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Duluth area fisheries is seeking comments through Friday, March 16 on updated lake management plans for Sand and Tamarack lakes in Carlton County. “Management plans describe the past, present and desire...

Read More